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conflict_monitoring_and_stimulus_selection [2015/09/14 16:25]
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conflict_monitoring_and_stimulus_selection [2015/09/18 12:02] (current)
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 From the conflict effect, it has been concluded that the monitoring of response conflict (i.c., its detection and subsequent resolution) is an automatic process, triggered by stimulus incongruency. However, there is no conclusive evidence for the automaticity of this process. As an alternative hypothesis, I put forward that people can typically make use of spatial attention to //prevent// response conflict. Therefore, I predict that, when spatial attention is deployed to one of the stimulus components, the conflict effect is no longer observed. ​ From the conflict effect, it has been concluded that the monitoring of response conflict (i.c., its detection and subsequent resolution) is an automatic process, triggered by stimulus incongruency. However, there is no conclusive evidence for the automaticity of this process. As an alternative hypothesis, I put forward that people can typically make use of spatial attention to //prevent// response conflict. Therefore, I predict that, when spatial attention is deployed to one of the stimulus components, the conflict effect is no longer observed. ​
  
-{{:​slide07.jpg?​400 |Snapshot of an example stimulus stream}}+{{:​slide07.jpg?​400 |Figure 1. Snapshot of an example stimulus stream}}
  
 To investigate this hypothesis, we will use a novel experimental paradigm. In this paradigm, the participant fixates a dot at the centre of the screen while stimulus streams are presented in the left and the right visual field. These streams are composed of stimuli that change continuously over the course of time. There are two stimulus categories; for concreteness,​ we assume them to be letters and digits. The participant responds using two buttons, one for his left and one for his right hand. Each of the two buttons is associated with one stimulus category (letters or digits), and the participant has to press this button when the fixation dot increases size (the so-called //​go-signal//​). A snapshot of an example stimulus stream is shown in Figure 1. Over the course of time, the stimulus streams change, with letters being replaced by digits or other letters, and vice versa for digits that are being replaced. ​ To investigate this hypothesis, we will use a novel experimental paradigm. In this paradigm, the participant fixates a dot at the centre of the screen while stimulus streams are presented in the left and the right visual field. These streams are composed of stimuli that change continuously over the course of time. There are two stimulus categories; for concreteness,​ we assume them to be letters and digits. The participant responds using two buttons, one for his left and one for his right hand. Each of the two buttons is associated with one stimulus category (letters or digits), and the participant has to press this button when the fixation dot increases size (the so-called //​go-signal//​). A snapshot of an example stimulus stream is shown in Figure 1. Over the course of time, the stimulus streams change, with letters being replaced by digits or other letters, and vice versa for digits that are being replaced. ​