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oscillatory_coupling_between_sensory_and_frontal_control_areas._investigating_their_relevance_for_behaviour [2015/09/18 11:56]
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oscillatory_coupling_between_sensory_and_frontal_control_areas._investigating_their_relevance_for_behaviour [2015/09/18 11:56] (current)
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-===== Oscillatory coupling between sensory and frontal control areas. ​Are they relevant for behaviour? =====+===== Oscillatory coupling between sensory and frontal control areas. ​Is it relevant for behaviour? =====
  
 Selective attention is one of the cognitive abilities that allows primates to be goal-directed in an environment that is cluttered with both task-relevant stimuli and distracters. One of the most robust findings in systems neuroscience is the attentional modulation of neural oscillations over primary sensory areas. This modulation pertains to the alpha band (8-14 Hz) oscillations over posterior (occipito-parietal) areas and the alpha- and beta band (15-25 Hz) oscillations over sensorimotor areas. The attentional modulation of these oscillations is typically observed in tasks that manipulate ​ spatial attention (mostly, //​attend-left//​ versus //​attend-right//​). Specifically,​ this modulation involves that the amplitude of these oscillations over some cortical area is smaller when attention is deployed to the corresponding part of the sensory input space (e.g., left visual field for the right visual cortex, or the right side of the body for the left somatosensory cortex) as compared to when attention is deployed to another part of the sensory input space (i.c., the right visual field and the left side of the body). This attentional modulation can be due to two factors: (1) a decrease in the amplitude over the attended cortical areas, and/or (2) an increase in the amplitude over the non-attended cortical areas. Especially the first factor has received strong empirical support (e.g., [[http://​cercor.oxfordjournals.org/​content/​24/​10/​2562.short|van Ede et al, 2013]]). Selective attention is one of the cognitive abilities that allows primates to be goal-directed in an environment that is cluttered with both task-relevant stimuli and distracters. One of the most robust findings in systems neuroscience is the attentional modulation of neural oscillations over primary sensory areas. This modulation pertains to the alpha band (8-14 Hz) oscillations over posterior (occipito-parietal) areas and the alpha- and beta band (15-25 Hz) oscillations over sensorimotor areas. The attentional modulation of these oscillations is typically observed in tasks that manipulate ​ spatial attention (mostly, //​attend-left//​ versus //​attend-right//​). Specifically,​ this modulation involves that the amplitude of these oscillations over some cortical area is smaller when attention is deployed to the corresponding part of the sensory input space (e.g., left visual field for the right visual cortex, or the right side of the body for the left somatosensory cortex) as compared to when attention is deployed to another part of the sensory input space (i.c., the right visual field and the left side of the body). This attentional modulation can be due to two factors: (1) a decrease in the amplitude over the attended cortical areas, and/or (2) an increase in the amplitude over the non-attended cortical areas. Especially the first factor has received strong empirical support (e.g., [[http://​cercor.oxfordjournals.org/​content/​24/​10/​2562.short|van Ede et al, 2013]]).